Couch Potato Drill
created: 3/22/2018 2:33 PM in SAFETY

Skill Building: The Couch Potato Drill


While most of us want to become better shooters, getting to the range isn’t always easy, and let’s face it, many of us lack the work ethic to really achieve greatness.  Enter the Couch Potato Drill!


Ammo is expensive, and the range can be pretty cold this time of year, so this dry fire drill will test your skills against some of Hollywood’s best.  Verify your firearm is completely unloaded, preferably moving all ammo out of the room. This step is important not just to maintain proper firearm safety, but also because you will be pointing your gun at one of your most prized possessions (your tv).


Start your favorite quick draw-heavy movie or tv show.  When a quick draw scene comes up, play through it a few times while practicing beating the actor to the draw.  Muscle memory is built by repetition of correct mechanics; we recommend a slower warm up with Barney Fife.



Work your way up to some of more skillful pistoleros of the big screen, focusing on proper mechanics and safe gun handling.

Image result for eastwood draw gif


Don’t be too hard on yourselves if you come across a scene you just can’t beat.  Jim Zubiena’s performance on Miami Vice required no acting - he was an IPSC Grand Master!

Image result for miami vice draw gif


Try it out, and let us know what movie scenes you have successfully bested.

created: 3/22/2018 2:33 PM in SAFETY


Dmon11 commented on 4/16/2020 5:31 AM
I train with my kids using their nerf guns ita fun and I teach them gun safety and control aswell for Myself. Training in walking breathing going around corners normal fun stuff teaching them to talk with balls lol with authority give commands its fun and fun training with my kids.
Rifleman188 commented on 8/21/2019 4:45 AM
I've done various "TV" drills for years primarily dry fire shooting the bad guys to practice front sight and trigger squeeze and build that oh so necessary muscle memory. I have done drills with handguns iron sighted rifles and carbines and am now finding the TV bad guys to be good tracking practice with a scout rifle with the pistol scope setup (Ruger Gunsite Scout w 2X7 Hi-Lux Scout BDC)
TheMrWolf commented on 5/15/2019 10:30 PM
I cannot recall anyone in my youth going out and "shooting" just for the hell of it and yet most were well versed in the use of their weapons. But then the men (and women) I was raised by came from an era where cartridges were not cheap. When I buy a new firearm or new to me anyway, I take it out to see if it shoots straight, I've never been to any range other then Ft Dix in 77. From what told it's just as well. I have no worries as to my proficiency with what I own. And some of the things you all say are rules now I've never heard of. Guess you all need those stuff now. When I draw my finger is on that trigger. But then when it's pointed at something be it cactus, critter or other likely it's about to meet it's maker. That is how I was taught. Good day.
bstogsdill commented on 12/1/2018 2:21 PM
This is more fun than dry firing against a target but maybe this would be good practice for speed mixed with targets so you can also work on holding still as you press the triggr
schooled commented on 11/26/2018 5:04 PM
Clint.
pharsyte commented on 8/25/2018 4:35 AM
Sometimes I think that people with firearms that do not train are far more dangerous than people who have no way to defend themselves.
Mobetta64 commented on 5/20/2018 2:57 PM
As a trainer, I am stunned at the number of students who respond they are proficient with their firearm and then proceed to drop the firearm on the first draw from a holster. They simply turn and exclaim it is a new holster. Here is my shocked look!
Weizen commented on 4/2/2018 12:11 PM
I mean, you might as well be a noguns.
Weizen commented on 4/2/2018 12:10 PM
I'm always extremely shocked at how many people own firearms and rarely touch or use them.
Latest Video
 
loader